Publications (Selected)

Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceedings and Invited Talks:

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun: Interfacing 1980s Arcade Hardware with Online Virtual Reality. 15th Irish Human Computer Interaction (iHCI) Symposium, Belfast School of Art, Ulster University. [Link]

Nolan, K: Graffiti and Street Art in Games. History of Games International Conference, November 2022, Online. [Link]

Nolan, K: Arcade Aesthetics, Play and Preservation through Blockchain and NFTs. OxBAT 2022, Oxford Blockchain, Art & Technology Conference, September 2022, Magdalen College, University of Oxford. [Link] [Slides]

Nolan, K: Street Fighter II: Early 1990s Bootlegs and Contemporary Homebrews for Retro Platforms. Replaying Japan 2022, The 10th International Japan Game Studies Conference, August 2022, Ritsumeiken University, Online. [Link] [Slides] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_rj2022,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Street Fighter II: Early 1990s Bootlegs and Contemporary Homebrews for Retro Platforms},
booktitle={Replaying Japan 2022 Conference Abstracts},
language = {English},
year = {August 2022},
pages = {73-75},
publisher={Centre for Game Studies, Ritsumeikan University},
Location = {Online},
url={https://kierannolan.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/ReplayingJapan2022_BookOfAbstracts.pdf}
}

Nolan, K: 3D and VR Reconstructions of Japan’s Game Centres. Japanese Game Centres as Urban Play Spaces workshop, 2022 DiGRA International Conference, July 2022, Jagiellonian University, Kraków. [Link] [Slides]

Nolan, K: Art Research through Arcade Interfaces. D.A.T.A. – Dublin Art and Technology Association, DATA Event 69.0, April 2022, NCAD / National College of Art and Design, Dublin. [Link]

Nolan, K: Art Research Experiments in Arcade Interface Reflexivity. ACM SIGGRAPH Digital Arts Community SPARKS, Artists’ Games: Critical and Creative Approaches in New Media Art, March 2022, Online. [Link]

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun: Interfacing 1980s Arcade Hardware with Online Virtual Reality. In Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques Conference Immersive Pavilion. SIGGRAPH ’21 Immersive Pavilion. New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery, 2021. DOI: 10.1145/3450615.3464526. [Link] [Video] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{10.1145/3450615.3464526,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {VR SuperGun: Interfacing 1980s Arcade Hardware with Online Virtual Reality},
year = {2021},
isbn = {9781450383684},
publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3450615.3464526},
doi = {10.1145/3450615.3464526},
abstract = {VR SuperGun is a custom hardware and software prototype allowing play of original arcade platforms through a network connection, reconstituting the material form of the arcade cabinet in digital space. It extends the format of the SuperGun, a device that contains the wiring of an arcade cabinet in consolised form.},
booktitle = {ACM SIGGRAPH 2021 Immersive Pavilion},
articleno = {16},
numpages = {2},
keywords = {webxr, videogames, emulation, arcade, virtual reality, physical computing},
location = {Virtual Event, USA},
series = {SIGGRAPH ’21}
}

Nolan, K: Eagle’s Computer Warrior: Japanese Arcades to UK Comics via Licensed Coin-Op to Home Computer Conversions. Replaying Japan 2021, The 9th International Japan Game Studies Conference, August 2021, University of Alberta / Online. [Link] [Video] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_rj2021,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Eagle’s Computer Warrior: Japanese Arcades to UK Comics via Licensed Coin-Op to Home Computer Conversions},
booktitle={Replaying Japan 2021 Conference Abstracts},
language = {English},
year = {August 2021},
pages = {33-34},
publisher={AI for Society (AI4S) signature area, Kule Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), and Prince Takamado Japan Centre (PTJC), University of Alberta},
Location = {Edmonton, Canada and Online},
url={http://replaying.jp/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/2021_abstracts.pdf}
}

Nolan, K: Panel Talk Participant. Digital Art in Ireland Panel Discussion, with EL Putnam, Conor McGarrigle, and Chris Clarke, April 2021, Sample-Studios and UCC Dept. of Digital Humanities, Online.

Nolan, K: JAMMA Arcade Standard, Association, Platform, and Aesthetic. History of Games 2020, Transnational Game Histories, October 2020, Online. [Link] [Video]

Nolan, K: DIY Micro Arcades: Game Center Dioramas and Coin-Op Miniatures. Replaying Japan 2020, The 8th International Japan Game Studies Conference, August 2020, University of Liege, Online. [Link]

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogames as Aesthetic Interfaces and Self-Reflexive Research Artefacts. SHU Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI), November 2019, Sheffield Hallam University. [Link]

Nolan, K: Arcade Archive Authenticity: Schematics, Spare Parts, and Retrofits. Collaborative Game Histories, October 2019, Finnish Museum of Games, Tampere. [Link] [Video]

Nolan, K: Arcade Game Design Adaptations: 1980s and 1990s Japanese Coin-Op Conversions and Pseudo Sequels for Western Computer Platforms. Replaying Japan 2019, The 7th International Japan Game Studies Conference, August 2019, Ritsumeiken University, Kyoto. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_rj2019,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Arcade Game Design Adaptations: 1980s and 1990s Japanese Coin-Op Conversions and Pseudo Sequels for Western Computer Platforms.},
booktitle={Replaying Japan 2019 Conference Abstracts},
language = {English},
year = {August 2019},
pages = {182-183},
publisher={Centre for Game Studies, Ritsumeikan University},
Location = {Kyoto, Japan},
url={https://drive.google.com/file/d/1J3rdk3TY6T2B_wOL679Lau7iKllXjKTN/view}
}

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun: Arcade Game Materiality. ELO2019, The Electronic Literature Organization Conference & Media Arts Festival, July 2019, University College Cork. [Link]

Nolan, K: Arcade Materiality Across Analog and Digital Space. Sites of Gaming and Arcade Situations, International Conference on the Cultural History of (Video)Game Arcades, June 2019, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg. [Link]

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogame Materiality: VR SuperGun. The State of Play, May 2019, Technological University Dublin, City Campus.

Nolan, K., Sloane, K., Retro Videogame Aesthetics and the Alien Universe. 40 Years of Alien Symposium, The Centre for Film, Television and Screen Studies, Bangor University. [Link] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_sloane_alien40_2019,
title = {Retro Videogame Aesthetics and the Alien Universe},
booktitle = {40 Years of Alien Symposium, Abstracts},
author = {Kieran Nolan and Kenneth Sloane},
address = {Bangor, UK},
year = {2019},
month = {May},
day = {24},
pages = {9-10},
abstract = {The constraints of vintage computing platforms bear upon both the cinematic Alien universe and its videogame offshoots.
The cathode ray tube green screens of the Nostromo’s MU-TH-UR 6000 are shaped by the constraints of 1980s hardware, but translate appropriately to 2122. The text displays of command line parsers remain a universal baseline of interface functionality, befitting a utilitarian focussed cargo vessel. Similarly the 1982 Grid Compass 1136 laptops used as remote sentry terminals during Aliens are minimalist due to their vintage, featuring monochrome amber displays and industrial design suitably spartantic for a military mission.
During the last four decades the Alien saga has crossed over to multiple paratextual forms, including videogames. Videogames are aesthetic interfaces, shaped by platform constraints. The platform constraints faced by game developers in the 1980s and 1990s have each necessitated unique creative takes on remediating the narrative and atmosphere of the Alien franchise as it has imprinted across the timeline of videogame platform evolution over nearly four decades, the initial entry been Alien by Fox Video Games (1982) for the Atari 2600 console.
This paper focuses in particular on three notable examples of Alien accross retro videogame platforms, each representing an individual generation of retro game aesthetic. These are Alien (1985) by Concept Press Software for the 8-bit Amstrad CPC microcomputer, Alien 3 (1992), developed by Probe Software for the 16-bit Sega Megadrive, and Alien Vs Predator (1994) by Rebellion for the Atari Jaguar, the first 64-bit game console. Each of the games detailed are examined in terms of audiovisual aesthetic, narrative, and authenticity to the franchise.
As early examples of movie to videogame adaptations, the system constraints of each host system add unique layers to perception of the Alien narrative, at times augmenting and adapting canon to adapt the movies’ properties to interactive form.},
publisher = {Centre for Film, Television and Screen Studies, Bangor University},
note = “40 Years of Alien Symposium ; Conference date: 23-05-2019 Through 24-05-2019”,
url = “http://alien40.bangor.ac.uk/programme.php.en”,
}

Nolan, K: Teaching with Twine to Author Media Rich Interactive Narratives. EdTech, May 2019, Dundalk Institute of Technology. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_edtech2019,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Teaching with Twine to Author Media Rich Interactive Narratives},
booktitle={Book of Abstracts. Edtech 2019: The Digital Transformation of Irish Higher and Further Education – Real or Imagined?},
language = {English},
year = {2019},
month={May},
day = {31},
pages = {152-153},
publisher={Irish Learning Technology Association},
Location = {Dundalk},
url={https://ilta.ie/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Edtech-19-Book-of-Abstracts-1.pdf}
}

Nolan, K: Game Aesthetics: Platform Constraints + Creative Affordances. Game Talk #4, April 2019, MA in Game Design, IULM University of Milan. [Link]

Nolan, K: Indie Game and New Media Exhibitions as Interface Layers. iHCI 2018, 12th Annual Irish Human Computer Interaction Conference, November 2018, University of Limerick. [Link] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{10.1145/3130859.3131430,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Indie Game and Media Art Exhibition Spaces as Interface Layers},
year = {2017},
isbn = {9781450351119},
publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3130859.3131430},
doi = {10.1145/3130859.3131430},
abstract = {This paper explores how the human computer interface of the experimental indie game Control was augmented through five different exhibitions across both new media art and indie game spaces. Interface elements considered include the tangible control input type, the style of visual display used, as well as the situated space of the game installation itself. Each installation setup encouraged a different style of interaction with the artifact. Observation of users in the exhibition spaces both live and through promotional video documentation alongside feedback given both in-situ and through press reviews provided valuable feedback into the development of the game, influencing its future development path.},
booktitle = {Extended Abstracts Publication of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play},
pages = {37–45},
numpages = {9},
keywords = {constraints, arcade, exhibition, interface, curation, indie game, control, metagame},
location = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
series = {CHI PLAY ’17 Extended Abstracts}
}

Nolan, K: JAMMA Arcade Platform: Interface Constraints and Aesthetic Affordances. Replaying Japan 2018, August 2018, The 6th International Japan Game Studies Conference, National Videogame Arcade, Nottingham. [Link] [PDF]

Nolan, K: Bridging Authenticity and Virtualisation in Arcade Videogame Interaction. IEEE Games, Entertainment and Media Conference (GEM) 2018, August 2018, National University of Ireland Galway. DOI: 10.1109/GEM.2018.8516455. ISBN: 978-1-5386-6304-2. [Link] [BibTex]

@INPROCEEDINGS{8516455,
author={Nolan, Kieran},
booktitle={2018 IEEE Games, Entertainment, Media Conference (GEM)},
title={Bridging Authenticity and Virtualisation in Arcade Videogame Interaction},
year={2018},
volume={},
number={},
pages={1-9},
doi={10.1109/GEM.2018.8516455}
}

Nolan, K: The Human Machine Art Interface: Arcade Port Aesthetics and Production Practices. Proceedings of the 2018 DiGRA International Conference: The Game is the Message, July 2018, University of Turin. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{
author={Nolan Kieran},
year={2018},
publisher={DiGRA},
title={The Human Machine Art Interface: Arcade Port Aesthetics and Production Practices},
booktitle={DiGRA \&\#3918 – Proceedings of the 2018 DiGRA International Conference: The Game is the Message},
month={July},
url={http://www.digra.org/wp-content/uploads/digital-library/DIGRA_2018_paper_306.pdf}
}

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogame Platform Art, Materiality, and Preservation Tactics. Game Studies Seminar, Centre for Computer Games Research, November 2017, IT University of Copenhagen. [Link]

Nolan, K: Indie Game and New Media Exhibitions as Interface Layers. CHI PLAY 2017: ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, October 2017, Pakhuis de Zwijger and Mediamatic, Amsterdam. DOI: 10.1145/3130859.3131430. ISBN: 978-1-4503-5111-9 [pp. 37-45]. [Link] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{10.1145/3130859.3131430,
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Indie Game and Media Art Exhibition Spaces as Interface Layers},
year = {2017},
isbn = {9781450351119},
publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3130859.3131430},
doi = {10.1145/3130859.3131430},
abstract = {This paper explores how the human computer interface of the experimental indie game Control was augmented through five different exhibitions across both new media art and indie game spaces. Interface elements considered include the tangible control input type, the style of visual display used, as well as the situated space of the game installation itself. Each installation setup encouraged a different style of interaction with the artifact. Observation of users in the exhibition spaces both live and through promotional video documentation alongside feedback given both in-situ and through press reviews provided valuable feedback into the development of the game, influencing its future development path.},
booktitle = {Extended Abstracts Publication of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play},
pages = {37–45},
numpages = {9},
keywords = {constraints, arcade, exhibition, interface, curation, indie game, control, metagame},
location = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
series = {CHI PLAY ’17 Extended Abstracts}
}

Nolan, K: Copyright Circumventions, Gameplay Modifications, and Platform Augmentations of Classic Coin-Operated Video Games. CEEGS / Central and Eastern European Game Studies Conference 2017, September 2017, Univerzita sv. Cyrila a Metoda, Trnava. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_ceegs2017,
address = {Trnava, Slovak Republic},
abstract = {This paper posits that the practices of hacking, modification, and retrofitting of arcade video games, by bootleggers, the retro arcade preservation community, and game artists serve to preserve and extend the lifespans and functionality of classic arcade platforms. By ignoring intellectual property conditions and circumventing bespoke play-only computational media, retro communities and black market enterprises render classic arcade platforms as into editable, augmentable form, allowing hardware and software adjustments for modification of gameplay and continued operation. Parallel to these commercial and archival focused activities, the repurposing of arcade platforms as editable canvasses allows experimentation by artists within the constraints of legacy arcade aesthetics.
Going beyond the reverse engineering of BIOS chips and duplication of ROM sets, the modified Bootleg editions of heavily pirated 1990s arcade titles such as Mortal Kombat II: Challenger Hack (1993) and Street Fighter 2: Rainbow Edition by Hung Hsi Enterprise Taiwan (c.1992) exist as combinations of fan service and black market entrepreneurship. These bootlegs proved popular to the extent that they directly influenced the development of Street Fighter Turbo II – Hyper Fighting (1992) and subsequent editions. Gameplay innovations adapted by Capcom from the bootleg editions include the adding of a fireball attack to Chun-Li’s fighting repertoire, and the ability to perform special moves in mid-air (Leone 2014).
The retro arcade scene as represented by online communities such as JAMMA+ and UKVAC display constant innovation in their work collecting and maintaining classic arcade games. Enthusiasts from diverse backgrounds including engineers, machinists, graphic designers, assembly language programmers pool together to provide resources for the refurbishment and retrofitting of arcade platforms long abandoned by their original creators. The Donkey Kong Internet High Score Kit (2016) exemplifies the ingenuity of the retro preservation community, bringing 1981 hardware to the internet age, compensating for the disappearance of the arcades as communal gathering points by facilitating competitive tournament play across network space.
These survival techniques come at a price however to the perceived authenticity of classic videogaming platforms in the collectors market. This hierarchy is topped by the original hardware platforms, while software emulators such as MAME and Retropie occupying the lower rungs of the value ladder, despite their close to identical functionality. The middle ground is occupied by bootleg arcade hardware, in particular modern FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) based systems that simulate rather than emulate.
Although existing in separate strands of arcade culture, and motivated by different factors, the three parallels of piracy, preservation, and artistic experimentation serve as necessary augmentations of the commercially sealed, consumer level interface of the arcade platform, contributing to the continued archival, active play, and cultural exposure of retro arcade games, platforms, and aesthetics.},
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
editor = {Mago, Zdenko and Buček, Silvester and Kabát, Michal},
booktitle = {Abstract Proceedings of the Central and Eastern European Game Studies Conference 2017},
publisher = {Faculty of Mass Media Commnunication, University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius},
title = {Arcade culture survivalism: Copyright circumventions, gameplay modifications, and platform augmentations of classic coinoperated video games},
keywords = {emulation, authenticity, platform, retro, arcade, fan communities, bootlegs, preservation},
year = {2017},
pages = {109-110},
isbn = {978-80-8105-873-8},
note = “Abstract Proceedings of the Central and Eastern European Game Studies Conference. September 28-30, 2017. Trnava, Slovak Republic.”,
url = “https://web.archive.org/web/20170929203014/http://2017.ceegs.eu/”,
}

Nolan, K: Sketching from the Screen: The Processes and Aesthetics of Arcade to Home Computer Game Ports in the 1980s and 1990s. WYSI(N)WYG: Video Game Visualities and Aesthetics Workshop, CEEGS / Central and Eastern European Game Studies Conference 2016, October 2016, Centre for the Meetings of Culture, Lublin. [PDF]

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogame Interface Art, Aesthetics and Materiality. DiGRA / FDG 2016: 1st International Joint Conference of DiGRA and FDG, August 2016, University of Abertay, Dundee. [Link]

Nolan, K: Indie Games as Art Research. The State of Play 2016, July 2016, Dublin Institute of Technology.

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogame Art. Playing the Game, May 2016, IED Istituto Europeo di Design, Milan.

Nolan, K: Arcade Videogame Interface Aesthetics. ISEA / International Symposium on Electronic Art 2016 香港 Cultural R>evolution, Hong Kong, May 2016, City University of Hong Kong. ISBN: 9789624423976 (pp. 128-134). [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_arcade_2016,
address = {Hong Kong},
title = {Arcade {Videogame} {Interface} {Aesthetics}},
shorttitle = {Cultural {R}{\textgreater}{Evolution}},
language = {English},
booktitle = {Cultural {R}{\textgreater}{Evolution}: proceedings of the 22nd {International} {Symposium} on electronic {Art}},
publisher = {School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong},
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
year = {2016},
pages = {128–134},
}

Hogan, T, Hornecker, E, Stusak, S, Jansen, Y, Alexander, J, Vande, A, Hinrichs, U, Nolan, K: Tangible Data, explorations in data physicalization. TEI ’16: Proceedings of the TEI ’16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, February 2016 (pp. 753–756). DOI: 10.1145/2839462.2854112. [Link] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{10.1145/2839462.2854112,
author = {Hogan, Trevor and Hornecker, Eva and Stusak, Simon and Jansen, Yvonne and Alexander, Jason and Moere, Andrew Vande and Hinrichs, Uta and Nolan, Kieran},
title = {Tangible Data, Explorations in Data Physicalization},
year = {2016},
isbn = {9781450335829},
publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/2839462.2854112},
doi = {10.1145/2839462.2854112},
abstract = {Humans have represented data in many forms for thousands of years, yet the main sensory channel we use to perceive these representations today still remains largely exclusive to sight. Recent developments, such as advances in digital fabrication, microcontrollers, actuated tangibles, and shape-changing interfaces offer new opportunities to encode data in physical forms and have stimulated the emergence of ‘Data Physicalization’ as a research area.The aim of this workshop is (1) to create an awareness of the potential of Data Physicalization by providing an overview of state-of-the-art research, practice, and tools and (2) to build a community around this emerging field and start to discuss a shared research agenda. This workshop therefore addresses both experienced researchers and practitioners as well as those who are new to the field but interested in applying Data Physicalization to their own (research) practice. The workshop will provide opportunities for participants to explore Data Physicalization hands-on, by creating their own prototypes. These practical explorations will lead into reflective discussions on the role tangibles and embodiment play in Data Physicalization and the future research challenges for this area.},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the TEI ’16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction},
pages = {753–756},
numpages = {4},
keywords = {Embodiment, Tangible User Interface, Shape-changing Interfaces, Data Physicalization},
location = {Eindhoven, Netherlands},
series = {TEI ’16}
}

Nolan, K: Video Games as Self-Reflexive New Media Research Artefacts. Research Leaders Seminar Series, October 2015, Dundalk Institute of Technology.

Nolan, K: Experimental (Game) Interaction Design. D.I.C.E., 2015, Letterkenny Institute of Technology. [Link]

Nolan, K: Open Source Hardware Technologies in Art, Design, Interaction, & Learning and Teaching. MAKE Symposium, March 2014, CIT Crawford School of Art & Design, Cork. [Link]

Nolan, K: Panel Talk Participant: Post Digital Research. Transmediale, February 2014, Berlin. [Link] [Video]

Nolan, K:  Control, an Experimental (Meta) Game about Interface Constraints. Digital Arts and Humanities Institute, CultureTECH, 2013, Derry.

Nolan, K: Control: Critical Play Through Interface Constraints. Irish HCI Conference 2013, June 2013, Casala Research Centre, Dundalk Institute of Technology. [Link] [PDF]

Nolan, K: Panel Talk Participant. Banter, Make a Move Festival, 2012, Daghdha Space, Limerick. [Link]

Mallon, B, Quinlan, J,  Nolan K: eLearning Modalities: A Framework for Selecting Audio. European Conference on eLearning, Groningen, 2012, ISBN: 1‍908272732.

Nolan, K: Circuit Bending Talk and Demo. Musica Nova, 2012, Dundalk.

Nolan, K: All Your Mediums Are Belong To Us. European Communications Research and Education Association / ECREA, 2011, Barcelona. [Slides]

Nolan, K: I See Dead Pixels: CPU to MTV, Lo-fi Computing Audio-Visuals as a Mainstream Aesthetic. Picteilín Creative Media Conference, 2011, Dundalk Institute of Technology. [Slides]

Nolan, K: ARGJacking 815, How I Hacked Lost. Ignite!, Mindfield, 2011, Dublin.

Nolan, K: Alternate Gaming Interfaces. Future and Reality of Gaming / F.R.O.G., 2010, Vienna, Austria. [Slides] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_frog2010,
title = “Alternate Gaming Interfaces”,
abstract = “Game interface design as a discipline is concerned with making the connection between a video game and its player as natural as possible. It aims to facilitate an ease of conversation between human and machine. This communication is facilitated by two aspects. These are player input hardware in the form of the game controller and game feedback, typically provided by visual, audio and tactile means. The ultimate goal of an interface design is a balance of aesthetics, functionality and playability.
The rise of availability of open-source software and hardware prototyping tools has seen the emergence of a vibrant DIY scene in experimental interaction design. This has led to many video game consumers manufacturing custom-made game interfaces for motivations including art, education and accessibility. Off the shelf video game control peripherals are been hacked and re-purposed to perform functions beyond the purposes their creators had originally envisioned, these alternate gaming interfaces feeding fresh inspiration back into the video games industry.”,
author = “Kieran Nolan”,
year = “2010”,
language = “English”,
pages = “39”,
editor = “Konstantin Mitgutsch”,
booktitle = “Book of Abstracts of the 4th Vienna Games Conference. FUTURE AND REALITY OF GAMING – F.R.O.G. 2010. GAME\\PLAY\\SOCIETY. , 24-26 September 2010”,
location = “Vienna City Hall, Austria”
publisher = “Universität Wien, Institut für Bildungswissenschaft”
}

Nolan, K: Hacking Toys into Tangible Interfaces. 15th International Symposium on Electronic Art / ISEA, 2009, Dundalk. [Link]

Nolan, K: The Real Virtual Living. 15th International Symposium on Electronic Art / ISEA, 2009, Belfast. [Link] [Slides] [PDF] [BibTex]

@inproceedings{nolan_realvirtual_2009,
address = {Belfast}
url = {https://isea-archives.siggraph.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ISEA2009_Proceedings.pdf},
abstract = {It is the contention of this paper that posthuman creativity is already taking place, rather than solely existing in the domain of a biomechanical cyberpunk dream. Manifesting work in both cyberspace and meatspace, the posthuman in this case is understood to be someone who embraces digital creative technologies (both hardware and software) taking advantage of the artistic opportunities they afford. The effects of Moore’s law over the last two decades has led to a profuse amount of cheap and obsolete computer equipment, both open and closed system. These castaway gadgets have become an abundant raw material, sparking the burgeoning movement of creative hardware hackers. The Internet has enabled the creative subversion of technology, through the dissemination of new creative tools and techniques. Closed video games consoles are being repurposed into new expressive platforms and tools. Indeed, the retro video gaming movement has grown beyond the digital domain, bringing pixels to oil painting and new flesh to performance art. The posthuman aesthetic, conceived in science fiction and nurtured online, is now very real and tangible.},
author = {Kieran Nolan},
booktitle = {Proceedings of ISEA2009; 15th International Symposium on Electronic Arts, Belfast.},
publisher = {Interface, University of Ulster},
title = {The Real Virtual Living},
year = {2009}
pages = {659–665},
}

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

Nolan, K: Retro arcade games as expressive and performative interfaces. International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, June 2021. DOI: 10.1080/14794713.2021.1943632. [Link] [BibTex]

@article{doi:10.1080/14794713.2021.1943632,
author = {Kieran Nolan},
title = {Retro arcade games as expressive and performative interfaces},
journal = {International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media},
volume = {17},
number = {2},
pages = {215-233},
year = {2021},
publisher = {Routledge},
doi = {10.1080/14794713.2021.1943632},
url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/14794713.2021.1943632},
eprint = {https://doi.org/10.1080/14794713.2021.1943632},
abstract = {This chapter explores arcade videogames as interfaces for performance in the context of digital art. When a new medium is invented it inevitably undergoes experimentation, and the hardware and software of coin-operated videogames are no exception to this rule. Performance is framed as it applies to the arcade videogame medium as a machine-driven act, and as human-machine interaction across user contexts. Retro game platforms provide a challenging set of audiovisual and interface constraints for focusing artistic output. Arcade games are accessible, immersive, and by nature of their public and competitive setting also performative. While this performance is not always deliberate on behalf of the user, it represents suspension of disbelief to act within the given play narrative. The black box nature of legacy arcade platforms as creative materials is explored through the practices of hacking, preservation, and reappropriation and reinterpretation of arcade hardware and software for creative means by independent artists and industry alike. This examination of arcade videogames as performative interfaces includes detailing the motivations, process, and results of the author’s own creative practice in arcade videogame interface art, in addition to a genealogy of arcade videogame themed artworks from media art practitioners going back to the 1980s.}
}

Nolan, K: Arcade Operator, an Art Game Experiment about Arcade Repair. Video Game Art Reader, November 2017, Video Game Art Gallery, Chicago. ISBN: 978-1-38-947045-5. DOI: 10.3998/mpub.12471115. [Link] [BibTex]

@inbook{10.3998/mpub.12471115.8,
ISBN = {9781943208432},
URL = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3998/mpub.12471115.8},
abstract = {Arcade Operator (Test Rom Edition) is an experimental art game where the player takes on the role of a video game Arcade Operator. Instead of playing the coin-ops present in the diegetic space of the onscreen arcade, the player must interface with the game cabinets as both operator and technician. Arcade Operator’s style of interaction is closely based on the side-scrolling brawler sub-genre of arcade gaming, switching the user context to a non-gameplay mode of interfacing with arcade video game platforms, albeit in an abstracted form through an arcade play mechanic.},
author = {Kieran Nolan},
booktitle = {Video Game Art Reader: Volume 1},
pages = {43–51},
publisher = {Amherst College Press},
title = {Arcade Operator: An Art Game Experiment About Arcade Repair},
urldate = {2022-08-16},
year = {2017}
}

Nolan, K: VRAME: A VR Arcade Cabinet Emulator Prototype. Post Digital Research Newspaper, Digital Aesthetics Research Center, February 2014, Aarhus University w/ Transmediale, Berlin. ISBN: 87-91‍810-21-3. [PDF] [BibTex]

@article{nolan_vrame:_2014,
title = {{VRAME}: {A} {VR} {Arcade} {Cabinet} {Emulator} {Prototype}},
volume = {3},
issn = {2245-7607},
url = {https://transmediale.de/content/post-digital-research-1},
abstract = {This article is a background research piece into the development of an experimental installation that prototypes the post-digital trajectory of arcade videogame emulation. It explores how interfacing with arcade videogame cabinets can be recreated in VR space, not just authentically recreating videogame input and feedback aesthetics, but also the external and internal physicality of the cabinet, alongside the ambience of the videogame arcade.},
number = {1},
journal = {Post Digital Research},
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
editor = {Andersen, Christian Ulrik and Cox, Geoff},
year = {2014},
pages = {21},
}

Lynch, R., Mallon, B., Nolan, K: Mastering the Puppets: Criteria for Pulling the Strings in an Alternate Reality Game Journal of Online Gaming and Virtual Worlds, 2013. ISSN: 1757191X. [Link] [BibTex]

@article{Lynch2013MasteringTP,
title={Mastering the puppets: Criteria for pulling the strings in an Alternate Reality Game},
author={Ronan Lynch and Bride Mallon and Kieran Nolan},
journal={Journal of Gaming \& Virtual Worlds},
year={2013},
volume={5},
pages={23-40}
}

Peer-Reviewed Book Chapters:

Nolan, K: Experimental Arcade Video Games as Self-Reflexive Media Art. Digital Art in Ireland, New Media & Irish Artistic Practice, Anthem Press, 2021. ISBN: 9781785274787. [Link] [BibTex]

@inbook{nolan_2021, title={Experimental Arcade Video Games as Self-Reflexive Media Art},
booktitle={Digital Art in Ireland: New Media and Irish Artistic Practice},
publisher={Anthem Press},
author={Nolan, Kieran},
editor={O’Sullivan, James},
year={2021},
pages={91–104}
}

Lynch, R., Mallon, B., Nolan, K: Blending Narrative, Play and Learning: An Examination of Alternate Reality Games as a Game-Based Learning Tool. Game Based Learning: Opportunities & Challenges, 2014, Cambridge Scholars. ISBN: 978-1-4438-5345-3. [Link] [BibTex]

@article{Lynch2013MasteringTP,
title={Mastering the puppets: Criteria for pulling the strings in an Alternate Reality Game},
author={Ronan Lynch and Bride Mallon and Kieran Nolan},
journal={Journal of Gaming \& Virtual Worlds},
year={2013},
volume={5},
pages={23-40}
}

Nolan, K: Control. Every Day is Play. A Celebration of the Video Game. Game Paused, 2014, ISBN: 978-0-9929930-0-9. [BibTex]

@inbook{nolan_2014, title={Control},
booktitle={Every Day is Play},
publisher={Game Paused},
author={Nolan, Kieran},
editor={Kenyon, Matthew},
year={2014},
pages={204}
isbn={978-0-992930-0-9}
}

Interviews:

Nolan, K: Built to Play 55: Interface The Machine . Built to Play, March 2015, CJRU 1280AM, Ryerson University, Toronto. [Podcast]

Nolan, K: Interview. Feature on Vector Festival YYZ Gameshow, March 2015, Toronto.

Peer-Reviewed Exhibitions:

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun. (Selected Exhibit, Indie Games Arena) Tokyo Game Show, September 2020, Tokyo. [Link]

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun. (Jury Selection, Entertainment Division), 23rd Japan Media Arts Festival, 2020, Tokyo. [Link] [Catalogue]

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun. Amsterdam JSNation Conference 2019, June 2019, Amsterdam. [Link]

Nolan, K: VR SuperGun. 3DCamp Dublin AR / VR Meetup, February 2019, Workday, Dublin.

Nolan, K: Control. ISEA / International Symposium on Electronic Art 2016 Cultural R>evolution, Hong Kong, May 2016, HK Polytechnic University. [Link] [Catalogue]

Nolan, K: Control. Game on! El arte en juego, November 2015, San Martín Cultural Center, Buenos Aires. [Link]

Nolan, K: Control. Out Of Index 2015 offline showcase, July 2015, Google Campus Seoul [Link]

Nolan, K: Control. Materiality, University Gallery, May and June 2015, National University of Ireland Galway. [Link]

Nolan, K: Control. The Blank Arcade, DiGRA Conference 2015, May 2015, Lunebürg. [Link] [Catalogue]

Nolan, K: Control. Art.CHI 2015, ACM SIGCHI 2015, April 2015, Seoul. [Link] [Catalogue]

Nolan, K: Control. Vector 2015, To Utility and Beyond: Interface Experiments in New Media and Game Art, February and March 2015, Interaccess Gallery, Toronto. [Link]

Nolan, K: Control. EGX 2014 Leftfield Collection, September 2014, Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London. [Link]

Nolan, K: Control (Concept Cartridge Artwork). My Famicase Exhibition 2014, May 2014, METEOR, Tokyo. [Link] [Link]

Nolan, K: Control. Finalist, A MAZE. 3rd International Independent Video Games Festival, April 2014, Berlin. [Link]

Nolan, K: App Concept. The Imaginary App Exhibition, 2013-2014, Artispace, VA.

Nolan, K: Bionic Roshambo GAME: The Future of Play, Zil Cultural Centre, July 2013, Moscow. [Link]

Nolan, K: Bionic Roshambo GAME: The Future of Play, The Science Gallery, 2012-2013, Dublin. [Link] [Catalogue]

Nolan, K: App Concept The Imaginary App Exhibition, 2012, Museum London, Ontario.

Nolan, K: 2D Artwork. Synth Eastwood, 2007, Dublin.

Theses and Dissertations:

Nolan, K: The Art, Aesthetics, and Materiality of the Arcade Videogame Interface: A Practice-Included JAMMA Era Arcade Platform Study. PhD Thesis. Trinity College Dublin, School of Computer Science and Statistics, 2019. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@phdthesis{nolan_art_2019,
title = {The {Art}, {Aesthetics}, and {Materiality} of the {Arcade} {Videogame} {Interface}: {A} {Practice}-{Included} {JAMMA} {Era} {Arcade} {Platform} {Study}.},
url = {http://www.tara.tcd.ie/handle/2262/90862},
school = {Trinity College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Statistics},
author = {Nolan, Kieran},
year = {2019},
}

Nolan, K: Paper Prototyping and User Testing as a Method for Helping Game Interface Design Students Improve Critical Thinking Skills. MA in Learning and Teaching, Dundalk Institute of Technology, 2012.

Nolan, K: Bionic Roshambo, hand gesture recognition as an arcade gaming interface. MA in Interactive Media, University of Limerick, 2002. [Link] [PDF] [BibTex]

@article{nolan2002bionic,
title={Bionic Roshambo Hand gesture recognition as an arcade gaming interface},
author={Nolan, Kieran},
journal={Diss. U of Limerick},
year={2002}
url={https://kierannolan.com/bionicroshambo}
}

Nolan, K: New Media Culture and Cyberspace. BDes (Hons) in Digital Media, Letterkenny Institute of Technology, 2001.

Nolan, K: Graffiti’s Filtration into Commercial Graphic Design. NDip in Design Communications, Letterkenny Institute of Technology, 1998.

Peer Review:

I’m on the board of reviewers for Game Studies Journal and I’ve previously peer-reviewed for DiGRA / Digital Games Research Association, DRS / Design Research Society, TEI / Annual Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, CEEGS / Central and Eastern European Game Studies Conference, FDG / Foundations of Digital Gaming, Interaction Design Awards, ACM CHI, History of Games, and ACM CHI Play.


Conference Organisation and Volunteering:

Steering Committee Member, History of Games Conference.

Chair for the ISSS 2022 / 17th Irish Screen Studies Seminar panel Practices of Making: Policy and Production, DkIT, 2022.

Co-Chair, Installations, ISSTA – Irish Sound, Science & Technology Association Conference, DkIT, 2017.

Co-organiser, Picteilín Conference, Dundalk Institute of Technology: 2011, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2018.